When Change Means What?

This is the final post in a series of blog posts (that I began here, and continued here, here, and hereon Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things on the body, the nation, and postcolonial meta-narratives. In an attempt to parse the tensions I feel the in the book–and many others of its era–I continue my thoughts below. 

So, where does this all leave us? I began this series of blog post with an extensive close reading of one small, some might argue insignificant, scene in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things. From this I concluded two things: 1) that the scene (and the novel as a whole) expressed a deep seeded anxiety around the concept of postcolonialism, and 2) this anxiety about postcolonialism pushes for an exploration of postcolonialism outside the structure (read: metanarrative) of postcolonialism. Read more

Ambiguously Brown is the New Black

My default position when it comes to the internet is that of a pur(sur)veyor.

Purveyor because I engage with the internet as an interface through which I can spread and promotes ideas, while also (metaphorically and literally) buy into the “goods” that others are selling. Surveyor because god-complexing is hard to avoid when it can oftentimes seem as if we can jump in and out of the world wide web and effect some change regardless of time, place, or physical/racial/gender limitations. Pursurveyor because I think I do a great job at persevering through the act of being on the internet–or any metaphysical space occupied by White Dudes. Read more

(Ex)Portability and Recrudescence

This post continues a conversation I began with this post and continued with this, and this post on Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things on the body, the nation, and postcolonial meta-narratives. In an attempt to parse the tensions I feel the in the book–and many others of its era–I continue my thoughts below. 

The God of Small Things obsesses over migration. In the first 20 pages alone, there are 5 instances of individuals migrating to and from Ayemenem; there are many more references to people travelling to and from places via highway, boat, motorbike, foot; they go to places like Australia, Canada, Great Britain. There is a sense that no one is ever where they want to be, where they’re supposed to be. No one is ever settled even when they are home. Why this agitation? Why this inability to stay still? Read more

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